An analysis of the poems ending poem and this is not the place where i was born

The poem takes place on a night in the "lonesome October" with a gray sky as the leaves are withering for the autumn season. In the region of Weir, by the lake of Auber, the narrator roams with a "volcanic" heart. He has a "serious and sober" talk with his soul, though he does not realize it is October or where his roaming is leading him.

An analysis of the poems ending poem and this is not the place where i was born

Share This is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in as said in the beginning of the poem. The whole wording of the poem is in Scottish accent making it difficult for non-Scottish to grasp the meaning of certain words easily.

Since then, it has been converted to modern English. Setting of the poem: The setting of the poem is in a bare field about to be hit by the cold winds of winter. The poem is written in 8 stanzas of 6 lines each. Each stanza has its own rhyme scheme. The second has the same scheme. Alliteration is largely prevalent in the poem.

Summary of the poem To a Mouse The speaker of the poem is talking to a mouse in the poem.

An analysis of the poems ending poem and this is not the place where i was born

The mouse is now without a house and winter is fast approaching. He understands that it has to live and anyway, whatever it steals is just the amount of cleansing his soul undergoes in return.

He then speaks of how the mouse thought to ride out the winter in comfort but then he came along and destroyed the house. The best laid plans of mice and men often go astray. Still, he says the mouse has got it better, as it lives only in the present and is not troubled by events of the past nor is it bothered by the fear of future.

He says the mouse need not immediately start to bicker. He continues by saying that he would loath to chase the mouse with murdering prattle.

An analysis of the poems ending poem and this is not the place where i was born

Prattle is a tool not unlike a small spade but with a long handle. Laith means loath and rin means run. All the words here are in Scottish accent. He says that the mouse is justified to be startled by him, what with the bad reputation mankind has.

The speaker describes himself as poor, earth-born companion and mortal. He says he does not doubt that the mouse steals food; but what of it, he says, after all, it too must live. In Scottish accent, daimen icker stands for an ear of corn, and a thrave stands for 24 ears of corn.

The speaker says that the mouse steals but 1 in 24 ears of corn. He would get a blessing, a small bit of cleansing of his soul of sins, and he would, in exchange, never miss that small bit of corn.

He describes it as wee-bit very small house and now, it is in ruins. The silly walls not silly literally, but weak are now being strewn around by the winds. And now, the mouse has nothing to build a new house with. Foggage in Scotland means a second growth of grass. And the mouse has nothing to protect itself with.

He says the mouse saw the fields bare and knew that the tiring period of winter was coming fast. And so, it thought to dwell in its home, safe from the blast of cold wind.

Now cell here reminds us of prisons, or of rooms in which monks or nuns sleep. The speaker means to say that the mouse house was like that, bare and simple. The best plans made by man and mouse often go astray and leaves us with, in place of the promised joy, nothing but grief and pain.

The speaker ends the poem by saying that the mouse was still when compared to him. The mouse lives only in the present. But the speaker can go backward into the past and think about his dreary prospects. He can forward to the future but he cannot see anything; so he can only guess and fear it.

The mouse is free from these troubles.Emily Dickinson, in full Emily Elizabeth Dickinson, (born December 10, , Amherst, Massachusetts, U.S.—died May 15, , Amherst), American lyric poet who lived in seclusion and commanded a singular brilliance of style and integrity of vision. With Walt Whitman, Dickinson is widely considered to be one of the two leading 19th-century American poets.

Best poems and quotes from famous poets. Read romantic love poems, love quotes, classic poems and best poems. All famous quotes. This poem is in the public domain.

Jean Toomer Born in , Jean Toomer is the author of Cane, a book of prose poetry describing the people and landscape of Georgia. When T. S. Eliot died, wrote Robert Giroux, "the world became a lesser place." Certainly the most imposing poet of his time, Eliot was revered by Igor Stravinsky "not only as a great sorcerer of words but as the very key keeper of the language.".

T.S. Eliot was no stranger to classical literature. Early on in his life, due to a congenital illness, he found his refuge in books and stories, and this is where the classics-studded poem The Waste Land stems from.

Drawing allusions from everything from the Fisher King to Buddhism, The Waste Land was published in , and remains one of the most important Modernist texts to date.

Emily Dickinson, in full Emily Elizabeth Dickinson, (born December 10, , Amherst, Massachusetts, U.S.—died May 15, , Amherst), American lyric poet who lived in seclusion and commanded a singular brilliance of style and integrity of vision. With Walt Whitman, Dickinson is widely considered to be one of the two leading 19th-century American poets.

Analysis of The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot