An analysis of the american revolution in the shoemaker and the tea party by alfred young

Memory and the American Revolution, by Alfred F. Young seeks to illuminate the American Revolution by examining the life of George Robert Twelves Hewes, a rank-and-file tradesman whose name appears with peculiar frequency in early American documents.

An analysis of the american revolution in the shoemaker and the tea party by alfred young

The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: My book is about an ordinary man who lived in Boston a good part of his life and was a shoemaker all of his life and who was active in most of the famous events of the American Revolution that took place in Boston: Then he became a soldier and sailor in the Revolution and left Boston, lived out his life in country towns.

And then when he was in his 90s, he was, quote, "discovered" in western New York; someone wrote a biography of him. And he was brought back to Boston inwhich someone wrote another biography of him.

He was the hero of the day for the Fourth of July. His portrait was painted, and he became a celebrity. And his name is George Robert Where does Twe--the name Twelves come from? Well, he apparently was asked that, and he said it was--he thought he was named after an ancestor on his mother's side, but he didn't know any more than that.

An analysis of the american revolution in the shoemaker and the tea party by alfred young

I've since learned it's a Welsh name, and that made sense because his--his father was--or his--the whole family was descended from the first settlers who came here from Wales. You brought this picture along with you. And it's actually a picture of a portrait. It's in the book.

When he came back to Boston inthe family commissioned a portrait and this is it. So the portrait portrays him not as a shoemaker, but in his Sunday best clothes, an old man leaning on a cane. And the picture was called "A Centenarian" because Hewes thought he was 99 years old, just beyond the verge of He was off by six years.

He was only It wasn't--I don't think it was an intentional lie. But he then passes into history as a near year-old man and as the last survivor of the Tea Party.

He wasn't the last survivor. There were 25 others, but that was a kind of sign of they didn't know all the people who had been in the Tea Party.

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You said, just as we sat down, that you'd been working on this book for 20 years? Well, the original essay appeared in the William and Mary Quarterly some years ago, in I'd been working on it for several years before then.

And the essay has had a second life because, oh, it was voted the best essay of the year and the best essay in five years. And then inthe--the--William and Mary Quarterly is the leading journal in early American history. It was voted one of the 10 most-influential articles in 50 years of that magazine.

So it then had a second life, and I received an offer from Beacon Press to publish it and bring it to a broader audience.

So the book consists of that essay, plus a new essay with my second thoughts about this man, my 20 years later. Why do you care about this man? Well, I--I've long been very unhappy with the traditional interpretation of ordinary people in the Revolution, but I didn't start out to do this man's biography.

I started out with questions about: What was the role of ordinary people in making the revolution in Boston? What were their ideas? Did they have an impact on events? And were they changed in the course of that? So I was looking for--for someone to peg this on because it's very hard to do this kind of history.

And these people leave--people at that level of society were called mechanics in those days.Nov 09,  · The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution, by Alfred F. Young. Beacon Press, pages, $ Beacon Press, pages, $ A lfred F.

Young seeks to illuminate the American Revolution by examining the life of George Robert Twelves Hewes, a rank-and-file tradesman whose name . Alfred Young's The Shoemaker and the Tea Party, takes readers to a whole side of the American Revolution not emphasized in history books.

Young writes in his book of individuals omitted and the events that shaped beginning of the Revolution and the United States as it is today. The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution by Alfred F.

Young George Robert Twelves Hewes, a Boston shoemaker who participated in such key events of the American Revolution as the Boston Massacre and the Tea Party, might have been lost to history if not for his longevity and the historical mood of the /5(4).

Hewes recollections of the events that took place were passed along in the monograph The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution by Alfred F.

Young. His recollections of the dumping of the tea into the harbor lead the reemergence of how significant the dumping of the tea was for the United States of America. The Shoemaker and the Tea Party has 29 ratings and 3 reviews. John said: Great, quick little read for anyone interested in the Revolution, the Early Repu /5.

Alfred Young's The Shoemaker and the Tea Party, takes readers to a whole side of the American Revolution not emphasized in history books. Young writes in his book of individuals omitted and the events that shaped beginning of the Revolution and the United States as it is today.

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The Shoemaker and the Tea Party: Memory and the American Revolution